Carbon Trust, World Bank Team Up to Combat Climate Change, One SME at a Time – Sustainable Brands

Earlier this year, the World Bank announced a fundamental shift in its role of alleviating global poverty, by refocusing its financing efforts towards tackling climate change through the lens of SMEs. Last month, the group launched a new Climate Business Innovation Network (CBIN) during COP22 in Marrakech to help commercialize and diffuse clean technologies through developing countries.

Year in Review: 2016 – LA Downtown News

The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator hit its final milestones, with the state-of-the-art facility in the Arts District taking more startup companies into its portfolio and wrapping up construction on an R&D center in conjunction with the LADWP. The $47 million LACI is one of a handful of incubator hubs for budding clean technology companies in the nation.

Los Angeles: A Look Back at 2016 – LA Mayor Eric Garcetti

This was an incredible year for Los Angeles. Here are our highlights of everything we accomplished together in 2016.

Energy Commission Funds LA Energy Innovation Cluster to Aid Entrepreneurs

SACRAMENTO August 16, 2016 –  The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator received a $5 million grant from the California Energy Commission today to establish a Los Angeles Regional Energy Innovation Cluster (LA REIC) that will support clean energy entrepreneurship and networking opportunities in the Southern California coastal region.

The LA REIC was one of several projects funded through the Energy Commission’s Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) program. The EPIC program funds innovative clean energy technologies and approaches that bring clean energy ideas to market.

The LA REIC will be the central coordinating organization for clean energy start-up companies in the Los Angeles Region and will provide access to resources and facilities to help entrepreneurs commercialize their innovations. The LA REIC will work with key stakeholders in Los Angeles, Orange, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties to identify the region’s energy needs and connect them with energy technology solutions being developed by early-stage business ventures and universities.

The LA REIC joins the Central Valley Regional Energy Innovation Cluster, the Bay Area Regional Energy Innovation Cluster and the San Diego Regional Energy Innovation Cluster as clean energy entrepreneurship hubs that have received grants from the Energy Commission. The clusters are seen as developmental pathways that will help the state meet its energy and greenhouse gas reduction goals.

EPIC grants were also approved for five projects that identify, test and demonstrate water and energy savings or that develop new approaches that accelerate the deployment of drought resilience strategies. Grants totaling $5 million were awarded to:

  • UC Davis for cooling technologies that reduce heat exposure for dairy cattle
  • Porifera, Inc., for a low-energy barrier system for water treatment
  • Altex Technologies Corp., for a hybrid wet/dry heat exchanger for chiller systems
  • Lawrence Livermore National Security LLC for a wastewater treatment process that reduces desalination costs
  • Kennedy/Jenks Consultants for a pilot test of a technology that minimizes the fouling of membrane surfaces in wastewater treatment operations

The City of Santa Monica received a $1.5 million EPIC grant to plan and design a microgrid that will incorporate renewable energy, energy storage and electric vehicle charging in that city. The grant stems from the Commission’s EPIC Challenge launched earlier this year. Teams made up of private and governmental entities compete against each other to demonstrate innovative strategies that could become models to help accelerate the development of zero net energy communities. Santa Monica’s entry is one of 13 projects selected to compete in the challenge.

To demonstrate the energy savings and increased user satisfaction possible by pairing comfort-sensing ceiling fans with learning thermostats, UC Berkeley received a $1.8 million EPIC grant. Comfort-sensing ceiling fans have built-in technology that automatically adjusts fan speed to the home environment, while learning thermostats automatically adjust home heating and cooling controls based on space conditions and user’s schedule. UC Berkeley will install the integrated fan/thermostat system in low income multi-family housing in disadvantaged communities throughout the state.

About the California Energy Commission

The California Energy Commission is the state’s primary energy policy and planning agency. The agency was established by the California Legislature through the Warren-Alquist Act in 1974. It has seven core responsibilities: advancing state energy policy, encouraging energy efficiency, certifying thermal power plants, investing in energy innovation, developing renewable energy, transforming transportation, and preparing for energy emergencies.

SBA’s 3rd Annual Growth Accelerator Fund Competition Awards $50,000 to LA Cleantech Incubator

LOS ANGELES – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), through its Office of Investment and Innovation (OII), Office of Native American Affairs, Office of Veterans Business Development, and its federal partners consisting of the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Education, announced the 68 winners of the third annual Growth Accelerator Fund Competition.  The winners include two Los Angeles based accelerators who will receive $50,000 each out of a total of $3.4 million in prizes to boost the economic impact of accelerators across 32 states and the District of Columbia.

In making the announcement, SBA Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet said:“SBA created the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition in 2014 as a way to make new connections and strengthen existing bonds within America’s small business support network, bringing entrepreneurs and innovators together and connecting them with local and national resources that support small business job creation and growth. These awards deliver on a longstanding commitment at SBA to strengthen and modernize these support systems especially in parts of the country where access to capital has been a major barrier to starting a business. This year’s winners show that our efforts are bearing fruit and further cementing our nation’s most pioneering accelerators, incubators and innovation hubs as major players driving America’s technology startup ecosystem.”

The purpose of the competition is to draw attention and funding to parts of the country where there are gaps in the entrepreneurial ecosystem. While there are entrepreneurial activities occurring nationwide, some are better supported by private sector ecosystems than others. SBA has created connective tissue among the over 200 winning entrepreneurial ecosystems now part of the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition program.

“Small businesses are the backbone of our economy, so the Small Business Administration’s decision to allocate resources for clean tech incubators like LACI in LA not only fosters innovation and creativity, but also grows our city’s economy and is welcome news,” said Congressman Xavier Becerra, member of the United States House of Representatives for California’s 34th congressional district and Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus.

Each organization will receive a cash prize of $50,000 from the SBA.  In accepting funds, the accelerators will also be committing to quarterly reporting for one year.  They will be required to report metrics including jobs created, funds raised, startups launched and corporate sponsors obtained. This will allow SBA to continue building upon its database of accelerators and their impact, and to develop long-term relationships with the startups and constituents in these innovative and entrepreneurial communities.

“California is home to thousands of innovators and forward thinkers.  It’s exciting that LA Cleantech Incubator had added the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Program to its toolbox of resources available for our entrepreneurs,” said Victor Parker, U.S. Small Business Administration District Director for the Los Angeles District Office.

Applications were judged by more than 100 experts with entrepreneurial, investment, startup, economic development, capital formation and academic backgrounds from both the public and private sector.  The first panel of judges reviewed over 400 applications and presentations and established a pool of 200 highly qualified finalists.  The second panels evaluated the finalists’ presentations and pitch videos and selected the 68 winners.

“Accelerators serve entrepreneurs in a broad set of industries and sectors – from manufacturing and tech start-ups, to farming and biotech – with many focused on creating a diverse and inclusive small business community.  Through this national competition, we are also empowering accelerators which are led by and support women or other underrepresented groups.  SBA will continue to explore ways to creatively harness this powerful network and connect startups with one another and with available government resources.  We reported to Congress 138 winners from 2014 and 2015 – made up of 5,000 companies that have raised $1.5 billion and employ nearly 20,000 people.  With the addition of the 2016 winners, the number of SBA supported entrepreneurs will significantly grow,” Contreras-Sweet added. 

In addition to the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition, SBA’s OII supports investment and innovation in California through two nationwide programs: the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Program and the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program. SBA licenses SBICs and provides $2 in government guaranteed debt for every $1 in private investment. Since the program was created in 1958, over $80 billion has been invested, helping finance 170,000 American small businesses, including companies like COSTCO, Amgen, Apple, FedEx, Staples, and Tesla and Intel. At present, 28 SBICs are located in California and 196 California small businesses received $1.02 billion in financings in FY 2015 alone.

The SBIR/STTR program is a key pillar in the federal government’s strategy to provide seed capital to talented entrepreneurs in science, technology and engineering. Since its inception in 1982, the program has awarded over 158,000 awards with $43.6 billion in funding to early stage companies, including small firms that grew to become many of America’s leading large firms, such as Qualcomm, Biogen, iRobot, and Symantec. The federal government made 1069 SBIR/STTR awards to 570 small businesses in California totaling $465.2 million in FY 2015. In aggregate since 1983, the federal government has made 32,737 awards to 7,558small firms in California for a total of $8.97 billion.

For more information about accelerators and the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition, visit: www.sba.gov/accelerators.

Leaders in Water Sustainability Gather at LA Kretz Innovation Campus

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Gubernatorial Candidates John Chiang and Antonio Villaraigosa Shared Their Vision for a More Sustainable California at the Innovate x Water 2016 Conference

Los Angeles, CA—November 18, 2016— Water sustainability solutions and innovation were the hot topics this week with two significant events on California’s on-going drought held at Downtown LA’s La Kretz Innovation Campus. City and state leaders came out to address audiences at the Innovate x Water 2016 Conference, presented by CORO Southern California in partnership with the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) and Southern California Water Committee (SCWC). Later in the week, the Canadian Consulate General Los Angeles joined the Canadian Water Innovation Roadshow at the Campus, presenting fifteen Canadian water technology companies to Southern California.

Greg Good, Master of Ceremonies for Innovate x Water and Director of Infrastructure Services for the City of Los Angeles, introduced California Gubernatorial candidates John Chiang, California State Treasurer, and Antonio Villaraigosa, former Mayor of Los Angeles, who spoke on the water crisis and the need for innovative technologies.  

“North versus South, farmers against environmentalists, dams versus tunnels — the warring territorial and economic interests of a state comprised of 39 million people has resulted in a decades-long water stalemate that harms our economy, public health, and way of life,” said California State Treasurer John Chiang. “We need a reimagined approach to securing a future where each drop of water is valued and Californians have access to what they need. We get there by driving innovation and investments through better pricing policies, regulatory flexibility, and new funding mechanisms.”

“There is enough water,” said 41st Mayor of Los Angeles Antonio Villaraigosa. “There just isn’t enough political will yet to get the water where it needs to be, to make sure less water is wasted and more water is recycled. But if we come together – we can get this done. We’re a great state because we are not afraid to take on great tasks – like creating and saving hundreds of thousands of jobs by solving our water challenge.”

Speaking about the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator at the newly opened La Kretz Innovation Campus, a vision of Villaraigosa’s when he was Mayor, he added “This is an example of what is possible.” In addition to hosting ongoing events on building a sustainable future and green economy for Los Angeles, LACI is a cluster-driven organization with quarterly cluster meetings on Water, Energy Generation & Storage, Built Environment, Transportation, Waste & Sustainable Materials and Agriculture & Food Science.

LACI’s Water Cluster helps support and grow the water technology industry in the LA region. The initial goal for the cluster work is to decrease fragmentation and increase collaboration between all stakeholders involved in water sustainability. LACI’s vision is to be a platform for government organizations, non-profits, academic institutions and corporate companies to work together and forge innovative partnerships with an emphasis on the value that technology can bring to the water sector. The cluster meets quarterly, coupled with an on-going stream of water events at the Campus. The next quarterly Water Cluster meeting is on January 18, 2017.

The role new water technologies and civic organizations play in addressing the drought were addressed in panel sessions at this week’s event, followed by presentations by LACI’s cleantech portfolio companies focused on water sustainability. LACI portfolio companies, Ayyeka, Divining Lab LLC, Envi, Rain Systems, Vena Water, and Water Canary were among the presenting companies.

About LACI

The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) is a private non-profit organization helping to accelerate the commercialization of clean technologies by offering flexible office space, CEO coaching, mentoring, and access to a robust network of partnerships and capital. LACI was founded in 2011 as a cluster-driven economic development initiative supported by the City of Los Angeles, LADWP and the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles. Recognized as one of the most innovative business incubators in the world, LACI identifies local entrepreneurs across multiple cleantech business sectors and guides them to market, creating jobs that advance LA’s green economy. In just five years, LACI has helped 60 companies raise $80M in funding, created 1,150 jobs, and delivered more than $230M in long-term economic value for the City of Los Angeles. LACI operates out of the La Kretz Innovation Campus with satellite offices in Northridge, CA and Silicon Valley and is the organizer of GloSho and founder of the Network for Global Innovation NGIN. For additional information, please visit: laincubator.org  

La Kretz Innovation Campus and Advanced Prototyping Center

The La Kretz Innovation Campus, Los Angeles’ new cleantech innovation hub, is a place where entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists, and policymakers can collaborate, promote and support the development of clean technologies and LA’s green economy. Designed by John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects (JFAK), the fully renovated 60,000 square foot facility is located in the dynamic Arts & Innovation District of Downtown Los Angeles. The Campus comprises 3.2 acres owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power and is approved for LEED Platinum rating, utilizing state-of-the-art green technology including a 175 kilowatt photovoltaic solar canopy, fast charger EV stations, bioswales, and LA’s first public greywater filtration and microgrid systems.

Media Contact:
Laurie Peters, lpeters@laci.org
LACI Communications Director
(818) 635-4101

Fred Walti in Los Angeles Business Journal

Fred Walti, the founding chief executive of the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator, is stepping down after six years at the helm, Los Mayor Eric Garcetti announced Thursday.

LACI Launches 2017 Sustainability & Technology Cluster Group Meetings for Energy – Transportation – Water – Waste & Sustainable Materials Built Environment – Agriculture & Food Science

cluster-press-release

A Full-House Gathering of Government, Industry and Research Participants for the Transportation Tech Cluster Included On-Demand Transit Plan through FASTLinkDTLA

 

Plans to Put LA’s Clean Energy Industry on the Map Announced at First Quarterly Meeting for Energy Generation & Storage Cluster

LOS ANGELES, CA – January 12, 2017 – The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI), a non-profit organization helping promising cleantech companies deliver market-ready solutions and further economic development for the LA region, kicked off the first of its 2017 quarterly cluster meetings this week with the Energy Generation & Storage and Transportation Cluster Groups. Plans for LA energy industry asset mapping and a global event on energy in Spring 2017 were announced, in addition to clearly-defined goals addressing transportation issues in downtown Los Angeles.

Founded as a cluster-driven organization, LACI is working to identify regional problems and find cleantech sustainability solutions by connecting key stakeholders in each sector. Quarterly meetings are held at the La Kretz Innovation Campus for each of the following groups: Water, Energy Generation & Storage, Built Environment, Transportation, Waste & Sustainable Materials and Agriculture & Food Science. The goal is to decrease fragmentation and increase collaboration between all stakeholders involved by building a platform for government organizations, non-profits, academic institutions, technology startups, and corporations to work together and forge innovative partnerships with an emphasis on the value that technology can bring to each industry sector.

“This week’s Energy Generation & Storage and Transportation Cluster meetings are a great example of the critical work being done in each sector of our sustainability groups,” stated Ben Stapleton, LACI VP Facilities & Operations. “We had leaders from municipalities, corporations, start-ups and research institutions gathered together to make an impact on the intersection of innovation, sustainability and technology.”

The Transportation Technology Cluster alone includes one-hundred registered members, six vehicle OEMs, two vehicle component suppliers, five alternative fueling companies, five non-profit advocacy groups, five state or municipal transportation-related agencies, four design/engineering firms, two higher education institutions, three ridesharing/pooling startups, and ten other transportation industry organizations. Among the projects discussed at the group meeting was the upcoming Advanced Transportation Showcase at the La Kretz Innovation Campus featuring new technologies and service models such as mobile charging, energy storage, integration with carsharing and pooling, electric vehicles, autonomous vehicle testing and other innovations.

Additional upcoming Cluster Group quarterly meetings for January 2017 include:

1/18/17: Water
1/19/17: Waste & Sustainable Materials
1/25/17: Agriculture & Food Science
1/26/17: Built Environment

LACI’s six Sustainability & Technology Cluster Groups were formed in 2016 and will convene throughout the year with regularly scheduled events, workshops and quarterly meetings supporting cleantech companies throughout the Los Angeles region. The organization hopes to create a vital space where local industry, policymaking, and research institutions can collaborate to jointly develop innovative solutions to the challenges facing each industry.

About LACI

The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) is a private non-profit organization helping to accelerate the commercialization of clean technologies by offering flexible office space, CEO coaching, mentoring, and access to a robust network of partnerships and capital. LACI was founded in 2011 as a cluster-driven economic development initiative supported by the City of Los Angeles, LADWP and the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles. Recognized as one of the most innovative business incubators in the world by UBI, LACI identifies local entrepreneurs across multiple cleantech business sectors and guides them to market, creating jobs that advance LA’s green economy. In just five years, LACI has helped 64 companies raise $118M in funding, created 1,200 jobs, and delivered more than $270M in long term economic value for the City of Los Angeles. LACI operates out of the La Kretz Innovation Campus with satellite offices in Northridge, CA and Silicon Valley and is the organizer of GloSho and founder of the Network for Global Innovation NGIN. For additional information, please visit: laincubator.org

La Kretz Innovation Campus and Advanced Prototyping Center

The La Kretz Innovation Campus, Los Angeles’ new cleantech innovation hub, is a place where entrepreneurs, engineers, environmental organizations, and policymakers can collaborate, promote and support the development of clean technologies and LA’s green economy. In addition to being home to the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) and an ecosystem of thought leaders, the Campus features 30,000 sq.ft. of office and event space along with the region’s highest caliber Advanced Prototyping Center where members can design, build, test, certify and manufacture products all under one roof. Features include an electronics lab, chemistry lab, cell lab, CNC center, water jet center, welding shop, 3D printing shop, use of premium CAD software, laser cutters, woodworking, an assembly bay, training centers and more. 

Designed by John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects (JFAK) and managed by LACI, the fully renovated 60,000 square foot facility is located in the dynamic Arts & Innovation District of Downtown Los Angeles. The Campus comprises 3.2 acres owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power (LADWP) and is approved for LEED Platinum rating utilizing state-of-the-art green technology including a 175 kilowatt photovoltaic solar canopy, fast charger EV stations, bioswales, and LA’s first public greywater filtration and microgrid systems.

 

Media Contact:
Laurie Peters, lpeters@laci.org
LACI Communications Director
(818) 635-4101

 

 

 

 

 


Bi-Monthly Gathering Featured Keynote Address from LA City Controller Ron Galperin, Open Data Initiatives in the City of LA, LA Metro on Measure M and the Japan External Trade Org

LOS ANGELES, CA – January 24, 2017 – The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) hosted its January Leadership Council Meeting at the La Kretz Innovation Campus last week featuring keynote speaker Ron Galperin, LA City Controller, and an impressive list of speakers including Trevor Houser, Rhodium Group; Pauletta Tonilas, LA Metro on Measure M; Lilian Coral, Chief Data Officer, City of Los Angeles; Hisashi Kanazashi, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO); and Steve Churm, discussing the Net Zero Newhall initiative from FivePoint.

Net Zero Newhall, a plan to build Newhall Ranch in the Santa Clarita Valley with net zero greenhouse gas emissions from construction or operation, was among the highlights at the event. Developer FivePoint has proposed Net Zero Newhall to win reapproval for Newhall Ranch, one of the largest, mixed-use master-planned developments in California. It is a $12.7 billion project with plans to build 21,500 units of net zero housing and create 60,000 permanent jobs along the way. Located 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, Newhall Ranch is the first of its kind to feature sustainability solutions for an entire community, including 25,000 EV chargers, solar panels on all homes, mobility and transit solutions for first and last mile, and a recycled water system enabling irrigation with no additional water requirements. The project is currently in its public comment period and letters of support for Newhall Ranch are welcome through the Newhall Net Zero website.

“A recent McKinsey Report said California may be short 3.5 million housing units by 2025. We can help close this gap and provide sorely needed jobs in the process—it is our responsibility,” stated Steve Churm, FivePoint Chief Communications Officer, developer of the project. “We plan to change the game when it comes to development, keeping California’s three highest priorities in mind—jobs, housing and the environment.”

Robert Fortunato, LACI Executive-in-Residence (EIR) and owner/builder of a net zero energy case study house, commented on the project, stating “We’ve proven that net zero emission buildings can be more affordable, comfortable, and clearly better for our health and the environment. Building at this scale with these goals will set a new standard, spur innovation, new jobs – and make a make a significant impact on climate change.  LACI’s network of portfolio companies and partners are perfectly positioned to accelerate this kind of innovative project.”

Fortunato is the newest addition to LACI’s team of highly-experienced EIR advisors, providing guidance and counsel to LACI’s cleantech portfolio companies. Fortunato’s focus is on built environment, with an emphasis on net zero commercial and residential innovations. He will be formally introduced at LACI’s quarterly Built Environment cluster group meeting this Thursday, January 26, at 4 p.m.

 

About LACI

The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) is a private non-profit organization helping to accelerate the commercialization of clean technologies by offering flexible office space, CEO coaching, mentoring, and access to a robust network of partnerships and capital. LACI was founded in 2011 as a cluster-driven economic development initiative supported by the City of Los Angeles, LADWP and the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles. Recognized as one of the most innovative business incubators in the world by UBI, LACI identifies local entrepreneurs across multiple cleantech business sectors and guides them to market, creating jobs that advance LA’s green economy. In just five years, LACI has helped 64 companies raise $118M in funding, created 1,200 jobs, and delivered more than $270M in long term economic value for the City of Los Angeles. LACI operates out of the La Kretz Innovation Campus with satellite offices in Northridge, CA and Silicon Valley and is the organizer of GloSho and founder of the Network for Global Innovation NGIN. For additional information, please visit: laincubator.org  

 

Media Contact:
Laurie Peters, lpeters@laci.org
LACI Communications Director
(818) 635-4101

 

This self-driving mini-bus could help make traffic fatalities a thing of the past

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By Steve Scauzillo, San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Mike Swords of the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator purposefully stepped in front of the self-driving mini-bus doing circles around an empty parking lot in the rain.

Quickly sensing the pedestrian, the on-board cameras relayed a signal to the autonomous vehicle’s computer, which told its brakes to engage. The bus stopped immediately and no one was injured.

“We haven’t seen any dead bodies out here so far,” joked an engineer with EasyMile, the maker of the 12-passenger autonomous vehicle making a stop in Los Angeles on Monday as part of a multi-city promotional tour.

About 60 business folks, city officials, urban planners and entrepreneurs met at the LACI innovation campus to take a test ride and tackle how to break down barriers preventing autonomous vehicles from entering the real world, from a public skeptical over safety to onerous regulations from government bureaucracies.

Read More:

http://www.sgvtribune.com/general-news/20170206/this-self-driving-mini-bus-could-help-make-traffic-fatalities-a-thing-of-the-past